Author Topic: Taylor Wimpey DPC Concerns  (Read 376 times)

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SJ15

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Taylor Wimpey DPC Concerns
« on: December 13, 2019, 11:21:09 pm »
First time poster long time reader. Apologies in advance if I'm posting in the wrong section or breaking any rules.

I am looking to buy a former new build Taylor Wimpey house which is 4-5 years old.
All was going well until I was told about a possible issue with the DPC at the front of the house.

I have attached some pictures.

Basically the survey mentioned that no DPC is visible. From my examination with some advice online, I think I can see it on top of the first row of bricks above the front garden grass. Which seems to run under the front door. Then there are some slabs which I believe are level to the DPC. From my understanding there should be two rows of bricks between the ground and the DPC. I must stress I am not an expert and just going by a faint outline of where I think I can see the DPC.

My thoughts were:
  • There seem to be a lot of Taylor Wimpey houses with this style of front door level with the lawn and little DPC clearance
  • How big an issue is this - enough for me to walk away from the purchase?
  • Would NHBC fixed this or care?
  • What solution/cost would remedy this? Or should I leave alone until I (may) have damp issues
  • Anyone else have this style of 2 bed house? Similar to a Gosford design I believe. Any experiences?

Thanks. Any advice is appreciated.


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Re: Taylor Wimpey DPC Concerns
« Reply #1 on: December 14, 2019, 08:29:50 am »
First of all, this was picked up by your survey so it is relevant and could be a future problem.
Bothe the building regulations sate that external dpc should be 150mm (two brick courses above finished ground level.  The key words being "should be"  not "must be".

The NHBC will do nothing until the defect caused "damage" to the home. Ie damp on inside walls, or damage to brick faces and mortar.

There are two solutions:
1) Bricks removed at 150mm above ground and a second dpc fitted.
2) A damp proof injection system above the dpc and ground which won't last forever, but will have a 10 year guarantee.
3) The finished ground level is lowered 150mm around the house.
The last one is possibly the easiest and cheapest.

If I were buying the home I would offer a substantial reduction on the asking price based on this defect or walk away.
You must realise that when you sell this home your buyer will have the same concerns as you do now.

Low dpcs are sadly a common defect in new homes caused primarily by the requirement to have a level threshold at the front door to comply with disability access requirements in the building regulations. The problem is, most site managers are not thinking about finished ground levels at the early stages when the dpc is bedded.
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SJ15

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Re: Taylor Wimpey DPC Concerns
« Reply #2 on: December 14, 2019, 11:10:25 am »
Appreciate the quick reply.

The surveyor actually didn't pick this up sadly. In the report he just mentioned there was no DPC "visible" but also mentioned that there is "no reason to believe a DPC would not be installed" and marked it as satisfactory. Hmm.... It was on another online forum where someone pointed this design out to me as a potential flaw.

The picture I posted of the corner of the house (near the drain pipe), there is evidence of damage on bricks by moss and some re-pointing looks like being required due to the damp. In the surveyor's report it was mentioned that this "could" just be a leaking gutter but I am concerned that he didn't think of it being linked with the ground being level with the DPC.

Would this be classed as enough damage by the NHBC?
There was another defect with the roof that the surveyor picked up with which the vendor has reported to NHBC so I could ask him to raise this one too.

I don't mind proceeding if NHBC identified it as an issue they would do the required work but my concern is they could take a long time to arrive at this conclusion (if at all) and hold up the sale. What sort of rough time do they usually take to bring someone out and assess it and do the repairs?

Any idea what sort of discount in the asking price you'd expect for correcting the DPC?
The side of the house, and the back seems to have trenches along side it so I think this issue just affects the front of the house. But couldn't be certain.

Thanks in advance.

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Re: Taylor Wimpey DPC Concerns
« Reply #3 on: December 16, 2019, 08:50:34 am »
The NHBC won't inspect this unless the exiting owner makes a claim.
When you own the house you can write to the NHBC.

I wouldn't  buy this defective house, that's my sound advice.

You will, at best, have a battle on your hands to get these defects sorted out, at worst the NHBC will dismiss your claim.
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SJ15

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Re: Taylor Wimpey DPC Concerns
« Reply #4 on: December 16, 2019, 11:25:00 am »
Thank you. Can I just clarify the below statement please?

"I wouldn't  buy this defective house, that's my sound advice."

I am thinking of walking away. I am going to assume NHBC will not do anything and I'll have to arrange repairs myself.

But if I were to maybe get £3,000 off the asking price - based on surveyor costing the roof repair at £1,000 and then I reserve maybe £2,000 for the hassle and cost of lowering the ground (front of house only) and re-pointing some brickwork, would you still advise against us?

Would you still advise to walk away because you think the potential damage already done or likelihood of more defects being found in the future in this house type is high?

I know I am keen on the house and finding it difficult to walk away, but before I do I just wanted to explore my options.

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Re: Taylor Wimpey DPC Concerns
« Reply #5 on: December 19, 2019, 07:43:59 am »
My advice still stands.

I am not a prophet so I am unable to say one way or another whether more defects will be found. Presumably you would be able to sue your surveyor for negligence if he missed any in his survey.

I would rather buy a house that has no problems at all at the outset than buy a house with issues that I would have to get fixed.

The choice is yours.

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