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Author Topic: Plaster smell and dust  (Read 16204 times)

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TaylorWimpeyDidThis

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Plaster smell and dust
« on: February 03, 2014, 01:12:23 pm »
I'd be grateful if anyone reading this can advise;

Three months since moving in and we are noticing a high amount of what appears to be plaster / silica dust on blinds and a small amount on the wall surfaces (when we wipe our hand over the surface). https://db.tt/IEQS8Pfb We have no kids or pets and the house is regularly cleaned and dusted.

We have also noticed that the shower cubicle in the ensuite and bathroom smell of new / damp plaster, both wet rooms are fully tiled, although we are suffering with the dreaded grout haze, which despite regular cleaning doesn't seem to be going away.

So three questions: is this kind of dust normal for a new build? will it reduce? and what is causing the smell?

Thanks   :)


New Home Expert

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Re: Plaster smell and dust
« Reply #1 on: February 04, 2014, 08:45:23 am »
This dust looks to me like fine floor screed dust.
This was almost certainly caused by the extensive grinding cutting etc of your floor when Taylro wimpey tried to get it level.
Previous photos showed the dust was absolutely everywhere.
I did suggest that dust would be on the fins of the radiators and this is probably what is now coming out due to convection.

You have a timber frame house which should be sealed with by vapour barrier. (should be!)
It should be taped where the sockets and switches penetrate it. (should be!)
There would be no plaster used on your home.  The filler used for the plasterboard taped joints is white.
Some builders do use a thin plaster-skim to finish the walls and ceiling - this is normally be pink.
I also know that you have had extensive work in your house after you moved in which will no doubt create even more dust.

The smell is probably a damp smell within the plasterboard under the finish (tiling/paint.) and possible timber components being damp  following your undetected plumbing leak over Christmas.

Regarding your tiling, I would suggest you write to Taylor Wimpey again and insist they take the tiles off and re do them.  They could check behind the plasterboard when they do.
Most wall tiling should be shiny!
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TaylorWimpeyDidThis

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Re: Plaster smell and dust
« Reply #2 on: February 04, 2014, 06:36:41 pm »
Thanks NHE, that's really helpful information.

I've checked the radiators and sure enough there is still some silica dust in the fins - amazing how much there is upstairs given the work was all on the ground floor.

There are still many overhanging tiles despite the tiler having been back twice - it turns out they sacked the original tiler. Interestingly, where they levelled the shelf in the bathroom, they left the original tiles in place, so the tiles are all sloping to the centre of the bathroom wall - a drop of 10mm over the space of 2.5 tiles - it makes me feel unbalanced when I'm stood up!

The current stance is that this is all "within tolerance" ! it looks terrible and was an expensive upgrade....

Thanks  :)

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Re: Plaster smell and dust
« Reply #3 on: February 05, 2014, 08:47:52 am »
You can buy a special radiator duster from Lakeland.
It is cone-shaped and works a treat on mine.

Regarding "within tolerance" you can read my own views on tolerances here.

In the "A Consistent Approach to Finishes" 1.2  S9 I can see  no mention of wall tiles being out of level, only the flatness of the tiles adjacent to each other and the wall over any 2 metre section.
The "tolerance allowed" for tiles "overhanging" each other is no more than 1mm.

Sack the tiler?  They should be sacking the site manager and the director David Brown!
New Home Blog - New Home Expert is committed to providing help and advice for people having issues with their new homes and difficulties with house builders as well as helping potential buyers reduce the risk of possible problems if they do buy.