Author Topic: Early experiences and questions  (Read 586 times)

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Newtothis

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Early experiences and questions
« on: August 19, 2018, 06:17:11 pm »
I have got my eyes on a couple of developments and had a few questions around Taylor Wimpey - some would say these could be alarm bells.

Firstly I made an offer that was rejected, it was just over 10% below the listed price. This is fine and I expected them to come back with another figure which I could then accept or reject. However, what happened next was strange. The sales lady rang me the next day and said my offer at an amount substantially above my original offer had been accepted and could I "please ring them to make an appointment to reserve the property".
This was very strange to me as I never made this offer. It was put forward without my consent. I told them I won't be coming into reserve the property as I did not make an offer at that price. Has anyone ever experienced this?
Should I make a complaint to head office or just leave it?
I am not comfortable with offers being put forward in my name unless I consent to them.

I noticed Taylor Wimpey seem very eager to haggle whereas other builders are more fixed with the pricing such as Crest. Why is this and is this something to be concerned about?

Finally, when I did make the original offer the sales clerk flashed a form in front of me and said I had to sign so they "could communicate with me" about the offer. I stupidly didn’t read the form properly and signed away as I was caught up in the moment. I think this was a data protection consent form but again am nervous I've signed something I shouldn't have and wonder if I should follow it up.
Is It normal practice to sign a consent form at the offer stage even if you have not reserved a property?

Thanks for your help
Newtothis


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Re: Early experiences and questions
« Reply #1 on: August 20, 2018, 06:37:49 am »
Housebuilders rarely accept an "offer" below the listed price. Sales staff have "negotiables" that can be anything from "free" carpets, turfed rear garden, stamp duty paid, extras and even cash discounts. It depends on the plot and the time of year.

I have no idea what has being going on with offers being put forward by not by you.
The form you signed was probably to do with GDPR but who knows. Certainly do ask for a copy of it.

My advice is that you should not be buying any new home and certainly not one from Taylor Wimpey based on your recent experience. It is almost certain that your lack of experience will be taken advantage of.

New Home Blog - New Home Expert is committed to providing help and advice for people having issues with their new homes and difficulties with house builders as well as helping potential buyers reduce the risk of possible problems if they do buy.


Newtothis

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Re: Early experiences and questions
« Reply #2 on: August 21, 2018, 10:13:33 pm »
Thanks for the information

I won’t be buying from them as thanks to this blog I found out on enquiry that all their homes are timber frames.

I’m curious about the comment homebuilders  "rarely take an offer".
I have been reviewing this site and on the "questions to ask the builder" page there is a statement that says only a complete fool would pay the purchase price.

How do we best negotiate with a builder to make sure we get the best value for money?


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Re: Early experiences and questions
« Reply #3 on: August 23, 2018, 08:33:12 am »
What I meant is that sales staff have around £3,000 - £5,000 in 'negotiables' to give away to get a sale. They usually save these for buyers who can proceed; those that have sold their house, cash buyers, those with decent deposits and mortgage pre arranged.

Housebuilders will very, very rarely agree to offers of 10% off the advertised price, especially now the Help to Buy is fuelling demand.

Be aware that some of the pages were written when the website was first launched in 2006 including the "Questions to Ask" pages.  Perhaps if I had written them today I would have said "only a complete fool would buy a newly-built house"

Good news is that you have avoided buying a timber frame new home

In addition, there are around 170 pages on the website and I just cannot afford to spend the time (unpaid) updating the content, most of which doesn't change.

Helping new homebuyers and campaigning for a New Homes Ombudsman is fast becoming a full-time unpaid job too!
New Home Blog - New Home Expert is committed to providing help and advice for people having issues with their new homes and difficulties with house builders as well as helping potential buyers reduce the risk of possible problems if they do buy.

Newtothis

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Re: Early experiences and questions
« Reply #4 on: August 25, 2018, 04:10:21 am »
Thank you for the explanation and for the work you are doing it’s really helpful! And yes I am relieved I did not buy that timber frame house.

I did want to ask you about your views on steering clear of new builds entirely.

Why is that the case?
Is it because of the poor workmanship these days or because you feel the market is inflated due to incentive schemes? Or perhaps both?

I’ve been looking around and when I compare what I can get in the new build market with some support through help to buy, vs what I can get in the pre-owned market, new build still seems attractive.

I acknowledge there is an element of risk associated with the purchase and I need to do my research and tread carefully, but provided I do all this I am struggling to see why I would be a complete fool to go ahead with the new build option given the alternatives in my price range are not that great either.

I have a decent income I can afford to pay off the home and won’t be over extending myself but I do like the idea of moving into a property that does not require work and all the pre-owned in my budget need renovation. Also using the help to buy equity scheme means I can keep some cash aside and get a fair chunk of the purchase price interest-free for 5 years.

Why is this such a bad idea?
I'm not disagreeing with your view, I’m querying this further so I can really understand where the risks lie and what I may be getting myself into as you have a lot more experience than me.

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Re: Early experiences and questions
« Reply #5 on: August 25, 2018, 07:21:00 am »
There are many disadvantages. Fact is 75% of home buyers would avoid buying any new home built after 2003.

Number one, has to be poor quality and indifference of housebuilders to fulfil their warranty obligations.
It is often the case that new homes need more work after moving in than a well-maintained 25 year old house.

The "help" of Help to Buy is no help at all as housebuilders have inflated prices way above the 20% help. If you add in legal fees and the lost equity increases of the 20% you don't own over the 5 year interest free period, using Help to Buy for a new home does not make any sense at all. All it has done has enabled people who cannot save a deposit, buy a new home at a higher prices, that they cannot really afford.

As with everything, one person's opinion will differ from another.  But the main thing to consider is, who will buy your second-hand small, dark, home when you decide to move?
It will probably have a very small overlooked rear garden, no front garden, with ongoing management charges for non-adopted roads and public open spaces, on a run down estate amongst social housing peppered amongst owner-occupiers.

At least you can see an existing house, negotiate on the price and get a full structural survey before you buy it! None of this is possible with a new home.
New Home Blog - New Home Expert is committed to providing help and advice for people having issues with their new homes and difficulties with house builders as well as helping potential buyers reduce the risk of possible problems if they do buy.

Newtothis

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Re: Early experiences and questions
« Reply #6 on: August 25, 2018, 08:26:28 am »
Thank you for the response