Author Topic: What is deemed "acceptable" in terms of damage?  (Read 853 times)

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steelseries85

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What is deemed "acceptable" in terms of damage?
« on: August 14, 2020, 05:48:06 pm »
First time buying a new build, I've been visiting the site regularly to see my home at various stages (mainly because the site security has been quite poor) and quite comfortable with the way the build has gone so far.

Now it's coming to the cosmetic side of it all nearing completion and it's general careless behavior of people that looks like they are causing damage. Things like stone cills are chipped, PVC windows / doors have dents / chips in the PVC.

Two things stand out to me though but I don't know how the developer would behave with me asking them to be sorted.... first is the canopy has a dent in it and is covered in crap / missing screw caps etc

Second is the doorbell wiring is exposed and they've left a hole in the wall behind it, looks like they moved it after they fitted the railings

Am I being too petty, or should I expect things to be damage free?



Midwest

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Re: What is deemed "acceptable" in terms of damage?
« Reply #1 on: August 15, 2020, 11:17:37 am »
No that's not acceptable. Make sure add that to the snagging list. Most developers have a policy on how that procedure go's, but damage has to be put right.

Tim Fee Snagging Inspector

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Re: What is deemed "acceptable" in terms of damage?
« Reply #2 on: August 15, 2020, 01:47:13 pm »
No you are not being petty. It is going to be your home and you will be paying for it over 25 years!
It should be as perfect as possible. Be sure to get it Professionally snagged and inspected BEFORE you legally complete.

All these snags are minor and cheap and easy to repair and make good.

Please name the housebuilder as some are more resistant to doing the right thing as others are!
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steelseries85

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Re: What is deemed "acceptable" in terms of damage?
« Reply #3 on: August 15, 2020, 04:21:29 pm »
Thanks all.

The housebuilder is Taylor Wimpey. Like I said I've been managing to get into the property at various stages of the build process (mainly because their site security has been pretty poor) and have been happy with pretty much everything I've seen so far.

Even the site sales team were ok with me when I visited the house once during second fix and noticed some missing sockets and incorrectly placed ones, and within 2 weeks on my next visit all that had been remediated.

With regards the outside cosmetic defects - I'll be sure to raise them. I've been assured that things like that will be spotted but I'm still going to give them a nudge just in case.

With regards snagging prior to legal completion - I do have a professional snagging company lined up for the day of completion / day after (HomeSnag). My solicitor did try and get it written into the contracts regarding allowing snagging prior to legal completion but Taylor Wimpey's legal team in Bristol outright refused it, and even made an idle threat at the time about how many times my solicitor was coming back on things suggesting they would abandon the sale. I'm glad I didn't have the pleasure of dealing with them directly myself.

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Re: What is deemed "acceptable" in terms of damage?
« Reply #4 on: August 19, 2020, 12:30:56 pm »
You have to wonder what Taylor Wimpey are trying to hide from you until AFTER you have handed over all the money to them?

Good luck. Hope it goes well. "The squeaky wheel gets the oil."
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Midwest

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Re: What is deemed "acceptable" in terms of damage?
« Reply #5 on: August 20, 2020, 04:27:34 pm »
I've bought a few new builds, and the snagging list was always completed after moving in. In fact I wouldn't want to complete one before moving in (major defects aside), as you would not be able to notice all fine detail in a few hours. Better to live in the property for the period, before the snagging list is due to be finalised.

Maxell

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Re: What is deemed "acceptable" in terms of damage?
« Reply #6 on: August 22, 2020, 09:35:52 am »
You should email a snagging list within a week or so of moving in. This list should be an initial check. Pay particular attention to glass & prefinished surfaces. It will be allmost impossible to go back to a builder after 6 months with a scratch or chipped unit.
You do not have to wait 6 months or a year to write a snagging list, you can email "defects" anytime within your two-year period.


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Re: What is deemed "acceptable" in terms of damage?
« Reply #7 on: August 24, 2020, 09:31:32 am »
Good advice. You should always write to the builder with any and all defects and/or snags as soon as you notice them.  This is especially true of scratches and other damage. The longer it is left, the who did it? becomes more difficult to prove.

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Midwest

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Re: What is deemed "acceptable" in terms of damage?
« Reply #8 on: August 31, 2020, 04:18:26 pm »
As said, most developers have a agreed route and timescale for reporting defects. It seems daft to me to be reporting them piece meal, unless they are major. With my latest house, built by Bloor Homes a snaglist was given to them by an agreed certain date. Had some minor defects that came to light subsequent to that, which they also rectified.

They've also been rectifying some minor defects, after two years were up, that were curtailed by COVID.

steelseries85

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Re: What is deemed "acceptable" in terms of damage?
« Reply #9 on: September 26, 2020, 04:37:40 pm »
So in fairness, I sent an email and they seem to have resolved the majority of the issues. The damage to the canopy was repaired, if you look closely you can see the repair but nothing outside that.

The doorbell though I'm gonna have to wait to see what they did, because it just looks like they've put more roughcast render in the hole. Completion is in 14 days - will keep you updated.

Repton buyer

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Re: What is deemed "acceptable" in terms of damage?
« Reply #10 on: October 19, 2020, 11:24:25 am »
Taylor Wimpey have a 2 week "window" to report cosmetic defects. After that, any scratches, divots, gouges, poor paintwork etc won't be rectified.

Like you, I had the professional snagger stood booked and between me and the door when they were handing over keys, I went nowhere without him checking first much to the annoyance of the sales team. He found 85 snags of which Taylor Wimpey repaired 60ish (others like wonky walls fell within their tolerances for poor workmanship)

Taylor Wimpey also refused to allow a professional snagger in beforehand, even when presented with insurance cover, RCIS certification and me threatening to pull out myself.


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Re: What is deemed "acceptable" in terms of damage?
« Reply #11 on: October 20, 2020, 07:09:37 am »
Poor paintwork should always be rectified.
The 2-week limit on damage is fair enough.
I suspect a lot occurs on moving furniture in.

I can never understand WHY large plc housebuilders that can well afford it, don't adopt a customer is always right approach to fixing defects that they should be ashamed of quickly and no quibble.
The fact that they even prevent a buyer's snagging inspector checking the home before legally completion shows money is their only priority. 

Many years ago, on the rate occasion a buyer had their home inspected I always let them do it before legal completion.
1) The customer was paying for someone else to do my job for me, saving me 2-3 hours.
2) We did anything/everything on their list, no matter how silly, before occupation which is far easier to do than once buyers move in with all they stuff.
3) It made it more unlikely that the buyer would come back with anything else.
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Maxell

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Re: What is deemed "acceptable" in terms of damage?
« Reply #12 on: October 20, 2020, 07:52:23 pm »
I think a reasonable snagging list before completion is as you say, much easier and cheaper than once a customer occupies. The balance of power is unlikely to change to the customer as there would be customers who would take it too far and demand work was done even if it was within the the standards.
Customers could delay completion and string the builders along indefinitely. Not saying the system works either way.
Most builders I know will do a home demonstration before completion and if the customer picks up any snags these are usually attended to.

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Re: What is deemed "acceptable" in terms of damage?
« Reply #13 on: October 24, 2020, 06:31:03 am »
I think a reasonable snagging list before completion is as you say, much easier and cheaper than once a customer occupies. The balance of power is unlikely to change to the customer as there would be customers who would take it too far and demand work was done even if it was within the the standards.
Customers could delay completion and string the builders along indefinitely. Not saying the system works either way.
Most builders I know will do a home demonstration before completion and if the customer picks up any snags these are usually attended to.

It is not practical for new home buyers to thoroughly check their home during the new home demonstration.
Whilst the site manager will be happy to correct any issues spotted during a buyer's walk through, it cannot be considered an opportunity for an inspection.  Indeed, many demonstrations take place often a week before legal completion with much work still outstanding even to finish the home.

As for buyers "demanding work to be done which is within standards" deemed by whom the housebuilders? The housebuilder's tolerances "get out of jail free card" for poor quality via the NHBC "Consistent Approach to finishes"?
If a buyer thinks it is wrong and not acceptable it is highly likely they are justified.

Finally if plc housebuilders knew in advance, that buyers would only legally complete when the home is finished to their satisfaction, quality would be improved dramatically and construction programmes extended to ensure better quality.
OK I admit there would be one buyer per development, that goes way too far as they say in the trade too "picky" but even they could be appeased with good site management and the right attitude.

 
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